the British Library allowed only four scholars to inspect the Codex Sinaiticus leaves in 25 years!

Steven Avery

Administrator
sister thread

"The oldest Bible in the world is kept in Leipzig like a treasure. It is so valuable that nobody can see the parchment"
https://www.purebibleforum.com/index.php/threads/a.726/post-1492


Tischendorf.

"the German scholar tended to regard the Codex, for practical purposes, as his own private property" p. 17

Some unpublished letters of S. P. Tregelles Relating to the Codex Sinaiticus (1976)
Timothy C. F. Stunt
Evangelical Quarterly

=====================================

The Digital Revolution in Scholarly Editing
Peter Robinson
University of Saskatchewan, Canada
https://www.academia.edu/30214414/T...larly_Editing_draft_version_correct_Figure_3_
Published in Ars Edendi Lecture Series Volume 4, 2016 p. 182


Ars Edendi Lecture Series Volume 4, 2016 p. 182
STUDIA LATINA STOCKHOLMIENSIA Volume IV
https://www.academia.edu/30852826/STUDIA_LATINA_STOCKHOLMIENSIA_Volume_IV

In twenty-five years up to 8 July 2009 the British Library allowed only four scholars to inspect the 347 leaves of the great 4th-century Codex Sinaiticus in their possession.5

5- Personal communication, Scott McKendrick, British Library ...i

Background:

Peter Robinson
University of Saskatoon
Dip. Ed., (Monash), M.A. & Ph.D. (Oxford) Professor
http://artsandscience.usask.ca/profile/PRobinson#/profile

ITSEE, University of Birmingham
- Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing
Co-founder and former Director of the Institute

In the 2015 New Perspectives book, Peter Robinson wrote:
20 The Making of the Codex Sinaiticus Electronic Book - p. 261


getportrait.php.jpg

Full quote:

It used to be that you needed special permission to see a whole manuscript online, or deep pockets to pay for a facsimile or commission a set of photographs. In twenty-five years up to 8 July 2009 the British Library allowed only four scholars to inspect the 347 leaves of the great 4th-century Codex Sinaiticus in their possession.5 On that day, images of the whole manuscript went online and were seen by over a million people in the next few months. Surely, this is a revolution, and a very fast one.

... the Codex Sinaiticus website: within the first four months of the sites launeh, over 1.25 million people visited it.
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Discussion of Leipzig\

https://forums.carm.org/threads/cod...simonides-timeline.13239/page-23#post-1413995
Kirsopp Lake, Leiden, 1911, Preface, Page A3:

"The Tsar was pleased to accept the present brought by Tischendorf; in November, 1859, the MS. was exhibited for a fortnight, and was then taken to Leipzig, in order that Tischendorf might issue a facsimile edition in accordance with the Tsar’s orders. [...] When the MS. was no longer needed for the purposes of preparing this edition it was finally handed over to the Tsar, and deposited in the Imperial Library, where it is still to be seen in a special show case in the Great Hall."

In "the Great Hall" of "the Imperial Library" in a special display (note: "SHOW") case in St. Petersburg.

Note...St. Petersburg was renamed "Petrograd" from 1914 to 1924, and then changed to "Leningrad" from 1924 to 1991, and then changed back to "St. Petersburg" after the fall of Communism.

The manuscript therefore was not totally inaccessible.

It was on public display (on "SHOW" it would seem).

https://forums.carm.org/threads/cod...simonides-timeline.13239/page-23#post-1414488
True, else Nikolai Alexandrovich Morozov - would not have been able to explain cogently why it was not an ancient manuscript when he saw it in 1914.

cancelled inspections

German Oriental Spciety - 1861

BAM - 2015
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
TNC on CARM

A note on photography and St Catherine's.

Apparently they had a ban on visitors taking photos of their manuscripts, except for a few (very few) exceptions with the monastery's hierarchy's blessing, (TMPK) from Tischendorf's time until sometime in the 20th century.
 
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