Hundredfold Martyrs - Ps-Cyprian - Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima -

Steven Avery

Administrator
Sermo de Centesima - The Harvard theological review - (1921)
Reitzenstein
http://books.google.com/books?id=IZ9JAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA337

Confirmed by Walter Thiele

Ps-Cyprian
The Hundredfold Reward for Martyrs and Ascetics: De centesima, sexagesimal tricesima [66] speaks of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit as "three witnesses" and was passed down with the Cyprian corpus. This was only first published in 1914 and thus does not show up in the historical debate. UBS-4 includes this in the apparatus as (Ps-Cyprian).

Totally missing in Grantley and Houghton!
Make sure this is with Potamius Priscillian, etc as recently found evidences.

Jean Daniélou
http://books.google.com/books?id=WItg6RQ2SgoC&pg=PA63

Dated Late 2nd century:
● Reitzenstein (1914) Eine frühchristliche Schrift ZNTW
● Daniélou (1977) Origins of Latin Christianity
● Rordorf and Tuilier (1978) La Doctrine des Douze Apôtres

Philip Sellew should be added here.
Danielou is more complicated in his French writing, speaking of a redaction.

Check Barbel and Orban.

pier franco beatrice
https://unipd.academia.edu/pierfrancobeatrice
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
This (1) is what needs improvement

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The starting line is 240 p. 83
It is wrong after spiritum sanctum
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qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies
It is then jumping to line 284 but note that line 283 is interesting
https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA84
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HIT #1:

(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15)

First section can be redone, and can have aqua et spiritu sancto added

● Certainly, whoever might be so inclined to accomplish the work of those six angels, he shall enjoy so much blessedness [fruitfulness] as the illustrious three, the Father and Son and Holy Spirit, which therefore you long for in the kingdom of heaven.[1]

utique qui se disposuerit ad [Line 239] persequendum opus illorum angelorum sex, percipiet fructus tam praeclaros [Line 240] tres, patrem et filium et spiritum sanctum .... qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies.
p. 83 ( p. 83, lines 238-240)
https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA83
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https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA84
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...For He Himself [Christ] is a step in the ascent into heaven, for He Himself is the gate, Himself the entry into live, by whom in your redemption from the contagion of the world you have been spiritually bound by the Three Witnesses. This Trinity, therefore, increases by the Ten Words [i.e., multiplied by the 10 Commandments] so that the thirty-fold reward is completed. [i.e., "the sum" that is 30 (3 multiplied by 10)].[3]
(p. 84, lines 286-289)

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This section is fine.

ipse est enim gradus ascensionis in caelum, ipse est [enim] porta, ipse in- [Line 287] -troitus vitae, a quo in redemptione tua a mundi contagione tribus testimoniis [Line 288] spiritaliter sis religatus. trinitas ergo ista per decem verba adolescit, ut [Line 289] trecesima merces compleatur.
(p. 84, lines 286-289)
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This section is fine.

For the Law of the Lord is hard and bitter, but it makes bitterness, in order that it might reveal sweetness. For also by John this is demonstrated, when the spirit hands over the book to the angel who broke the seals, saying: "Take the book and eat it up. And it shall make thy belly bitter, but in thy mouth it shall be sweet as honey." This means: by the mouth of three witnesses it will be proved, that is: by the mouth of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit it will be confessed, because it is apparent that honey [Latin: mel] is written in three letters. For certainly, we also read honey [Latin: mel], constituted of three letters.

lex enim domini dura est et amara, [Line 349] <sed> amaritudinem facit, ut dulcedinem ostendat. nam et per Iohannem de- [Line 350] -monstravit, cum spiritus [PAGE 87] librum angelo sigilla solventi traderet dicens: ”Accipe [Line 351] librum et devora eum et amaritudinem faciet ventri tuo, sed in ore tuo erit [Line 352] dulce, tamquam mel.” (Rev 10:9) hoc est per os trium testium probari, id est per os [Line 353] patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri, quod mel tribus litteris constat scribi; [Line 354] nam et mel quidem legimus tribus litteris statui.
(p. 86-87, lines 348-352)
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Wohlenberg
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WoG might want to highlight illustrious three, the Father and Son and Holy Spirit,

Removed from hit


...Therefore you who have learnt to receive God through virtuousness, observe his promise too, which said : Anyone not reborn from water and holy spirit, will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Therefore you who will long to arrive in the kingdom of heaven, do not cast out that spirit of renewal by your lustful living.[2]
(p. 84, lines 282-285)
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Bogdan
https://www.marquette.edu/maqom/bogdan2.pdf
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73 “Angelos cnim dominuscum ex ignc principum numcro vii... crcarct, ex his unum lilium sibi constituent quern Isaias dominum Sabaol |ul] praeconarcl disposuil.” I dr the text, see R. Reitzennstein, Fine fruhchristliche Schrift von den dreierlei I ruchten des christlichen Lebens, ZNW 15 (1914) 60-90, here 82 (a new critical edition with English translation by P. Sellew is to be published in the near future). The dating of this text is a matter of controversy, with verdicts ranging from late second to the fourth century. The following scholarly treatments are directly relevant the topic at hand:
Barbel, Christos Angelos (see n. 66), 192 195;
J. Danielou, Le traite “De Ccntesima, Sexagcsima. Triccsima” ct le judeo-christianisme latin avant Tertullien. VigChr 25 (1971) 171-181, esp. 174-175;
A.P. Orban, Die Frage der ersten Zeugnisse des Christenlateins. VigChr 30 (1976)

214 238; P. Sellcw, The Hundredfold Reward for Martyrs and Ascetics: Ps.-Cyprian, De
centesima, sexagcsima, triccsima, St Pair 36 (2001) 94 98.
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Raymond Brown's Appendix to his commentary of John's Epistles.
https://www.amazon.com/Epistles-Joh...ooks&ie=UTF8&qid=1338130547#reader_0300140274
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/bibleversiondiscussionboard/the-comma-johanneum-and-raymond-brown-t5746.h


29 The Pseudo-Cyprianic Sermo de Centesima, published by L Reitzenstein, ZNW 15 (1914) 60—90, is attributed by H. Koch, ZNW 31(1932) 248, to fourth-century Africa and (possibly) to a follower of Priscillian, drawing upon Cyprian’s works. It speaks of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as “three witnesses” without any reference to I John (PL Supp 1, 65; Reitzenstein, 87).
(Note 27, p. 782 in 1982 edition it is Note 29, p. 784) -

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Steven Avery

Administrator
Sermon the Hundredfold, Sixty-fold, and Thirty-fold (175-200 AD)

• [Daniélou] The De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima comes to us from the sphere of Latin Judaeo-Christian apocalyptic writing of the second century. It was first edited by Reitzenstein [1914]; who believed that it was a second century document which had, in view of the doctrine contained in it, originated in a gnostic environment.
(Daniélou, The Origins of Latin Christianity, 1977, p. 63)

Dated Late 2nd century:

● Reitzenstein (1914) Eine frühchristliche Schrift ZNTW

● Daniélou (1977) Origins of Latin Christianity

● Rordorf and Tuilier (1978) La Doctrine des Douze Apôtres;

• [Hunter] For the author of this sermon, the ‘hundredfold’ reward was reserved for martyrs, the ‘sixtyfold’ for virginal ascetics (who are styled ‘combatants’ (agonistae)), and the ‘thirtyfold’ for married persons who had renounced sex upon receiving baptism [also known as”continent"]. Those who remained sexually active appear to have been [PAGE 115] excluded from reward altogether. Addressing married persons the author urged them to take seriously their baptismal commitment and to embrace total celibacy. ...Laced with biblical readings that echoed the Diatesseron of Tatian, the Acts of Paul and Thecla, and the Gospel of Thomas, the Latin sermon The Hundredfold Reward influenced the thought and language of later orthodox Christians, such as Cyprian of Carthage, even when they did not follow all of its radical encratite prescriptions.
(Hunter, Marriage, Celibacy, and Heresy, 2009, p. 114-115)

• [Schanz : The three groups: martyrs, ascetics, and the continent.] They all stand in the struggle of the Spirit against the flesh, they all imitate Christ, they all suffer in the world for eternal joy, they all operate the religion, whose essence,beginning and end, is asceticism; Teaching and active morality are completely withdrawn. They all fulfill the Ten_Commandments, but they fill them in various degrees, multiplying their number by different factors: i) the martyrs with 10 righteousness-es (10 x 10 = 100), like Christ, attain the consummate perfection; ii) the ascetics correspond to the 6 creation angels or the 6th day, the Sabbath, and rest from all evil works (6 x 10 = 60); iii) the justi follow the three witnesses to whom they are baptized, father, son and spirit (3 x 10 = 30).
(737d. “Pseudo-Cyprian, Sermo centesima sexagesima tricesima” in Geschichte der Römischen Literatur. Von Martin Schanz, 1922, part 8, vol 3, p. 384-385)

• [Beatrice] The number 30, the reward for those who preserve continence in marriage, results from the multiplication of the ten commandments for the three witnesses of baptism, that is, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.
(De cent. 33,84 [HIT #1]:”Trinitas ergo ista per decem verba adolescit, ut [Line 289] trecesima merces compleatur.”Cf. 44,87 [HIT #2]:”Hoc est per os trium testium probari, id est per os [Line 353] patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri...")
(Beatrice, “Martirio ed ascesi nel sermone pseudo-ciprianeo” in Paradoxos politeia, 1979, p. 22)

HITS:
● Certainly, whoever might be so inclined to accomplish the work of those six angels, he shall enjoy so much blessedness [fruitfulness] as the illustrious three, the Father and Son and Holy Spirit, which therefore you long for in the kingdom of heaven.[1] ...Therefore you who have learnt to receive God through virtuousness, observe his promise too, which said : Anyone not reborn from water and holy spirit, will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Therefore you who will long to arrive in the kingdom of heaven, do not cast out that spirit of renewal by your lustful living.[2] ...For He Himself [Christ] is a step in the ascent into heaven, for He Himself is the gate, Himself the entry into life, by whom in your redemption from the contagion of the world you have been spiritually bound by the Three Witnesses. This Trinity, therefore, increases by the Ten Words [i.e., multiplied by the 10 Commandments] so that the thirty-fold reward is completed. [i.e.,”the sum”that is 30 (3 multiplied by 10)].[3]

Latin:
1. utique qui se disposuerit ad [Line 239] persequendum opus illorum angelorum sex, percipiet fructus tam praeclaros [Line 240] tres, patrem et filium et spiritum sanctum qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies.
(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 83, lines 238-240)

2. qui ergo deum per sanctimonium accipiendum didicisti, et promissum eius [Line 283] obserua, qui dixit: Si quis non renatus fuerit ex aqua et spiritu sancto, [Line 284] non intrabit in regnum caelorum. qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies [Line 285] peruenire, illum spiritum renouationis tuae lasciue uiuendo noli expellere.
(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 84, lines 282-285)

3. ipse est enim gradus ascensionis in caelum, ipse est enim porta, ipse in- [Line 287] -troitus vitae, a quo in redemptione tua a mundi contagione tribus testimoniis [Line 288] spiritaliter sis religatus. trinitas ergo ista per decem verba adolescit, ut [Line 289] trecesima merces compleatur.
(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 84, lines 286-289)

● For the Law of the Lord is hard and bitter, but it makes bitterness, in order that it might reveal sweetness. For also by John this is demonstrated, when the spirit hands over the book to the angel who broke the seals, saying: ”Take the book and eat it up. And it shall make thy belly bitter, but in thy mouth it shall be sweet as honey.”This means: by the mouth of three witnesses it will be proved, that is: by the mouth of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit it will be confessed, because it is apparent that honey [Latin: mel] is written in three letters. For certainly, we also read honey [Latin: mel], constituted of three letters.

○ Latin: lex enim domini dura est et amara, [Line 349] <sed> amaritudinem facit, ut dulcedinem ostendat. nam et per Iohannem de- [Line 350] -monstravit, cum spiritus [PAGE 87] librum angelo sigilla solventi traderet dicens:”Accipe [Line 351] librum et devora eum et amaritudinem faciet ventri tuo, sed in ore tuo erit [Line 352] dulce, tamquam mel.”(Rev 10:9) hoc est per os trium testium probari, id est per os [Line 353] patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri, quod mel tribus litteris constat scribi; [Line 354] nam et mel quidem legimus tribus litteris statui.
(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 86-87, lines 348-352)

Translator Jeroen Beekhuizen's note: The author explains the text of Revelations 10:9 to refer to the testimony of the Trinity. The clue to this is the Latin word”mel” (honey) which he finds in the text. To the author this has a deeper meaning than”honey”alone, because this word was deliberately chosen (according to the author) for it's three letters (m-e-l). At least, this is how I understand these Latin lines.
(Jeroen Beekhuizen, Correspondence, 28 October 2019)

Comments:
• ...Rordorf and Tuilier (1978) [La Doctrine des Douze Apôtres] ...aduce a late second century sermon (i.e., De centesima, de sexagesima, de tricesima) as a parallel in content [to the Didache] (p. 58).
(Jefford, Didache in Context, 1995, p. 90-91 fn. 15)

• [The treatise”De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima”often found among the works of Cyprian,] First published by R. Reitzenstein in 'Eine frühchristliche Schrift von den dreierlei Früchten des christlichen Lebens', ZNW 15 (1914), pp. 60-90. Reitzenstein dated this text to the end of the second century. A number of scholars disagreed with this assessment and dated it to the fourth century; so e.g., both H. Koch and G. Wohlenberg. ...J. Daniélou has demonstrated that this writing was known and used by Cyprian. Thus, it cannot be later than the mid-third century. Daniélou follows Reitzenstein in opting for the late second century. P.F. Beatrice (in A. di Berardino, (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Early Church, vol. 1, trans. A. Walford (Cambridge: Clarke & Co., 1992), p. 223) places it in the period from the late-second to the mid-third century.
(Hannah, Isaiah's Vision, 1999, p. 83 fn. 9)

• [Daniélou] Certain conclusions may be drawn from our discussion of the De centesima. The treatise, which was undoubtedly known to Cyprian, in whose circle the rather primitive Latin of the text was probably corrected and improved, is a Latin Judaeo-Christian sermon from the end of the second century. It exhibits characteristically Judaeo-Christian features: freedom in the use of biblical quotations, an allegorical exegesis of the New Testament parables and an angelomorphic Christology. Tertullian, as we know, reacted strongly against all these characteristics. The author of our sermon also made use of a collection of Pauline texts which would seem to have been in large measure the same as that which: according to the information provided by Clement of Alexandria, was used by Tatian and by Cassian. In addition he may have used Tatian's Diatessaron in its Latin translation. Finally, his work is decidedly encratite in character and he bears witness to the existence of a Judaeo-Christian encratite tendency in Africa at the time of Tertullian.
(Daniélou, The Origins of Latin Christianity, 1977, p. 92)

• [Daniélou] As for the parable which forms the object of the sermon, the hundredfold, the sixtyfold and the thirtyfold are the martyrs, the continents and the husbands ["the just”i.e., righteous] who live in continence [abstain from sexual relations]. ...Later, in the fourth century, the three categories were to be interpreted as the virgins, the widows and the husbands.
(Daniélou, The Origins of Latin Christianity, 1977, p. 80)

• [Sellew] The homilist's interpretive key in considering the three rewards is to search the Scriptures for instances of tens, sixes, and threes, that is, numbers that can serve as multiplication factors of the Ten Commandments to produce hundreds, sixties, and thirties. His favored technique is catchword association. There are ample examples [PAGE 280] of tens and threes available in the Bible and in Christian teaching, such as the parable of the (ten) Talents (Luke 19:12), and ten psalters of Psalms 33, and an obscure reference to the blessing of”ten cities of God”in an unknown psalm. A ready instance of a symbolic three is available in the trinitarian formula, which the homilist employs in a delightful”midrash”on the bittersweet scroll swallowed by the prophetic seer.
(Sellew, Five Days of Creation?, 1990, p. 280-281)

• [Beatrice] To obtain the numbers sixty and thirty, which serve to express the prize of the virgins and the continents respectively, the homelist uses a sort of mystical arithmology which [PAGE 228] consists in multiplying the numbers six (of the angels and the days of creation) and three (of the persons of the Holy Trinity) by the number 10 (of the divine commandments). (Cf. De cent. 26,82).
(Beatrice, Il sermone De centesima, in Augustinianum, no. 19 1979, p. 228-229).

• [Daniélou] Certain symbolic elements in the De centesima also point to the early date of the document. Tobias' fish is used to symbolise Christ - its flesh is eaten for food as Christ's is. This is clearly an example of the theme of the eucharistic fish, of which there is evidence in the inscription of Abercius, the Sibylline Oracles and the frescoes of the early catacombs. [The theme of Tobais offering the fish to the angel is shown in the catacomb of Thrason - third century. The theme of the 'great fish' is also found in the Gospel in Thomas.] The reference to the theme of the fish occurs in De cent. 65, 35-39. F.J. Dolger has drawn attention to the importance of this theme in the De centesima. The gall of the fish represents the Christian law, which is bitter at first, but becomes sweet. This gives rise to a play on words between”fel”(=gall), and”mel”(= honey), which is, of course, evidence of the Latin origin of the document. A similar theme of bitterness becoming sweetness is also found in Hippolytus'“Apostolic Tradition”21 [PAGE 72] in a similar text and in connection with milk and honey. There is also a comparison between”fel”(= gall) and of”mel”(= honey) in the Muratorian fragment. The three letters of”fel”(= gall) and of”mel”(= honey) are also given a Trinitarian significance in the De centesima, the words being linked with baptism as a profession of faith in the Trinity and as”illumination”(De cent. 65, 41).
(Daniélou, The Origins of Latin Christianity, 1977, p. 71)

• [Sandt] The Ps.-Cyprian treatise “De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima” which distinguishes three classes of Christians, yielding different quantities of fruit (hundred-fold, sixty-fold, and thirty-fold) and, in support of this view, almost literally quotes (as”Scripture") Didache 6.2 [cf. Reitzenstein, esp. p. 79, lines 132-135; cf. Daniélou, 173.]
(Sandt, The Didache, 2002, p. 239)

• [Wilhite : Didache Quoted in Sermo] And at another place this scripture bears witness and admonishes, with words,”If you are able, son, to do all the commandments of the Lord, you will be perfect; but if only one or two commandments, love the Lord with all your heart and those like you as [yourself].”• Latin: et alio in loco scriptura haec [Line 133] testatur et admonet dicens:”Si potes quidem, fili, omnia praecepta domini [Line 134] facere, eris consummatus; sin autem, vel duo praecepta, amare domino [Line 135] num ex totis praecordiis et similem tibi quasi (te ipsum).”
(Wilhite and Jefford, The Didache, 2019, p. 18; cf. Reitzenstein, esp. p. 79, lines 132-135)

• [Draper] While the debate over the relationship between the two writings [Didache & Gospel of Matthew] has still not been settled, and some, myself included, would argue contrariwise for a dependence of Matthew on the Didache, few”scholars now date the text later than the end of the first century CE or the first few decades of the second. If dependence on Matthew is ruled out, then there is little to establish the date of the text except for internal evidence, so that a number of recent studies have even argued for a very early [PAGE 3] date in the mid first century. [PAGE 6]...The survival of the Didache as an independent text is, to some extent, accidental. It presents us with a moment frozen in time, a community which still lived within the Jewish world-view and practice, competing with the successors of the Pharisees for [PAGE 7] control of the same social space. It remains focussed on the Torah and its fulfilment in practice, even though it admits Gentiles without requiring them to become Jews. It is concerned about ritual purity in baptism and eucharist. Its Christology is Davidic and it envisages a return of the Lord on the clouds, accompanied by the righteous departed, to gather them from the four winds into the kingdom (10:5, perhaps echoing Ezek 37:7-14), probably to establish it ‘on earth as it is in heaven’ (8:2). Its local elected leadership of bishops and deacons seems to be in contention with Spirit-inspired prophets and teachers, while apostles might present themselves at its door claiming their right to support on their journeys. This is a picture much at odds with the church as it emerged in subsequent centuries. Jewish Christian communities which tried to continue this kind of tradition were marginalized and even demonised as heretics, while few traces of their life and witness to Jesus have survived. The evidence of the Didache is thus particularly valuable as evidence of, and a witness today of, the roots of the Christian movement in Torah faithful Judaism.
(Draper, The Didache, academic.edu, 2019, p. 2-3, 6-7)
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Richard Reitzenstein - (1861-1931) 1914 - TWOGIG -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_August_Reitzenstein
(Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 84, lines 286-289)
p. 60-90
https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA60
'Eine frühchristliche Schrift von den dreierlei Früchten des christlichen Lebens', ZNW 15 (1914), pp. 60-90. 1921
http://books.google.com/books?id=IZ9JAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA337

Harvard Theological Review - 1921
Further investigation, however, in which Harnack (ThLZ 39, 1914, 220-223), De Bruyne, Heer, Seeberg, Wohlenberg (ThBl 36, 1915, 65-69), and others have taken part, ... Christology has an archaic stamp.
Harnack
De Bruyne - gnostic
Heer - days of Justin

Eric Seeburg (in Sellew)
‘Eine neugefundene lateinische Predigt aus dein 3. Jahrhundert,' Neue kirchliche Zeitschrift 25 (1914) 481.

Theologisches Literaturblatt, Volumes 35-36
Wohlenberg
https://books.google.com/books?id=BPQ9AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA197
https://dlibra.bibliotekaelblaska.pl/Content/58023/09.pdf
Discusses heavenly witnesses

Rauschen on rebaptism also
Ernst
https://books.google.com/books?id=IZ9JAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA338
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Martin Schanz - 1922
“Pseudo-Cyprian, Sermo centesima sexagesima tricesima” in Geschichte der Römischen Literatur. Von Martin Schanz, 1922, part 8, vol 3, p. 384-385)
https://books.google.com/books?id=19QNAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA383
PICS CAN GO BELOW

Hugo Koch - 1932 (in Sellew)
7 Notably Hugo Koch. ‘Die ps.-cyprianische Schrift De centesima. sexagesima. tricesima in ihrer Abhiingigkcit von Cyprian.' ZNW 31 (1932) 248-272.
attributed by H. Koch, ZNW 31(1932) 248, to fourth-century Africa and (possibly) to a follower of Priscillian, drawing upon Cyprian’s works.

Christos Angelos Barbel (see n. 66), 192 195; 1941
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Walter Thiele - 1959
http://www.thlz.com/seiten/1960/69/44872/?inhalt=heft=1960_2#r21
See next post.

Hummel - (1974)
https://www.google.com/books/editio...entesima"+'koch"&pg=PA133&printsec=frontcover

Arpád Peter Orban - A.P. ,Die Frage der ersten Zeugnisse des Christenlateins. VigChr 30 (1976)
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/A-Orban
free read - German
https://www.jstor.org/stable/1583337

Jean Daniélou, The Origins of Latin Christianity, 1977, p. 92 p. 80 p. 71- TWOGIG
https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Origins_of_Latin_Christianity/e8MbAAAAIAAJ
https://books.google.com/books?id=e8MbAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA1
Jean Danielou, Le traite “De Centesima, Sexagesima. Tricesima” ct le judeo-christianisme latin avant Tertullien. VigChr 25 (1971) 171-181, esp. 174-175;
https://brill.com/view/journals/vc/25/1-4/article-p171_20.xml?language=en
Proquest
https://www.proquest.com/docview/1304750816
1971 French Journal Article
https://www.jstor.org/stable/1583316
“Le traité ‘De Centesima, Sexagesima, Tricesima’ et le judéo-christianisme latin avant Tertullien.” Vigiliae christianae 25 (1971): 171-81.
https://books.google.com/books?id=ZfB5DwAAQBAJ&pg=PA201

Rordorf and Tuilier (1978) La Doctrine des Douze Apôtres; TWOGIG
Willy Rordorf, André Tuilier

Pier Franco Beatrice - TWOGIG
https://unipd.academia.edu/pierfrancobeatrice
Pier Franco Beatrice, ‘Martirio ed ascesi nel sermone pseudo-ciprianeo “De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima”,’ in Paradoxos politeia: Studi patristici in onore di Giuseppe Lazzati, ed. Ranicro Cantalamcssa and L.F. Pizzolato (Milan, 1979) 3-24; p. 22 in TWOGIG
idem, 'Il sermone De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima dello Ps. Cipriano e la teologia del martirio,’ Aug 19 (1979) 215-243.
Pier Franco Beatrice (in A. di Berardino, (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Early Church, vol. 1, trans. A. Walford (Cambridge: Clarke & Co., 1992), p. 223) places it in the period from the late-second to the mid-third century.
(Hannah, Isaiah's Vision, 1999, p. 83 fn. 9)
(Beatrice, Il sermone De centesima, in Augustinianum, no. 19 1979, p. 228-229)
The Transmission of Sin: Augustine and the Pre-Augustinian Sources (2013)
Pier Franco Beatrice
https://books.google.com/books?id=DflQEAAAQBAJ&pg=PA234
See Below

Raymond Brown - 1982
29 The Pseudo-Cyprianic Sermo de Centesima, published by L Reitzenstein, ZNW 15 (1914) 60—90, is attributed by H. Koch, ZNW 31(1932) 248, to fourth-century Africa and (possibly) to a follower of Priscillian, drawing upon Cyprian’s works. It speaks of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as “three witnesses” without any reference to I John (PL Supp 1, 65; Reitzenstein, 87).

J A Fossum (1987)
Kyrios Jesus as the Angel of the Lord in Jude 5–7
In the Pseudo Cyprianic treatise De Centesima 216, the Son is said to be the first among the angels and the 'Lord Sabaoth' whom

Jefford, Didache in Context, 1995, p. 90-91 fn. 15 - TWOGIG -
has Rordorf and Tuilier

(Hannah, Isaiah's Vision, 1999, p. 83 fn. 9)

Schmalz - mentioned in Sellew as to R corrections p. 97

Philip Sellew - 2001 - TWOGIG
http://cnes.cla.umn.edu/people/profile.php?UID=psellew

Melissa Hart Sellew
https://cla.umn.edu/about/directory/profile/sellew

Philip Sellew
Associate Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
University of Minnesota psellew@umn.edu (612) 625-2026
https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/ffiles/gs25494/nKSun6STrA


Philip Sellew, Five Days of Creation?, 1990, p. 277-284)
https://www.academia.edu/45522623/F..._Unusual_Exegesis_Ps_Cyprian_De_centesima_26_

"There is ample indication that our writer resorts to paraphrase, rewording, or imaginative application of scriptural passages when it suits his purposes, as in the parable of the Talents, which becomes in his telling more specifically a story about ten Talents, to provide a factor for multiplication" - p. 281

Noted at CARM discussion by cjab.
https://forums.carm.org/threads/hundredfold-martyrs.10873/page-3#post-831943

Expositio et quæstiones in Aristotelis De anima (1995) - only have partial
The Hundredfold Reward for Martyrs and Ascetics: Ps.-Cyprian, De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima
Philip Sellew
http://books.google.com/books?id=XBLtIGhU9UYC&pg=PA94

p. 95
One controversial question about the homily concerns its date and circumstances of composition. Reitzenstein suggested an origin in Carthage before the end of the second century. While other historians have accepted his arguments for a North African provenance, some have pushed the composition date back by several generations7. I have concluded that, on balance, the language, attitudes, use of Scripture, theological viewpoints, and the narrative situation implied by the text all point most strongly to rigorist circles of Christian Carthage in the first half of the third century. The concepts and use of apocryphal texts seem to require a relatively early date, while the language used shares much in common with Cyprian. This state of affairs may best be explained not as evidence of direct borrowing or literary imitation of one author by the other, but instead as revealing a shared environment, along with a common storehouse of biblical texts. When Cyprian discusses the divine rewards for martyrs, for example, he may sometimes employ the sevenfold recompense mentioned in Luke 18 (according to the Old Latin text) and display a keen interest in other biblical examples of the number seven; yet when he discusses the triple fruits of the Parable of the Sower, Cyprian dispenses them in a manner reminiscent of (but in fact different from) our author 8.

7 Notably Hugo Koch, ‘Die ps.-cyprianische Schrift De centesima. sexagesima, tricesima in ihrer Abhiingigkcit von Cyprian.’ ZNW 31 (1932) 248-272.

8 Ad Fort. 11-12: the seven Maccabean martyrs (2 Macc. 7) prefigure the sevenfold reward for those who renounce their families (Luke 18, 29-30); De hab. uirg. 21: hundredfold fruit destined for martyrs; sixtyfold for consecrated virgins; thirtyfold for the ordinary righteous (iusti); cf. Danielou. Latin Christianity, 65-66.

Critica Et Philoloaica. Nachleben. First Two Centuries, Tertullian to Arnobius,
Egypt Before Nicaea, Athanasius and His Opponents (2001)

Phillip Sellew - Minneapolis
https://books.google.com/books?id=XBLtIGhU9UYC&pg=PA94

The Hundredfold Reward for Martyrs and Ascetics: Ps.-Cyprian,
De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima .................................... 94

I have recently completed work on a new critical edition and English translation of the Latin work De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, a homily composed in North Africa some time in the third century and preserved among the works of Cyprian of Carthage. The text was discovered by R. Reitzenstein and published in 1914 1. Though it was reprinted in the Patrologia Latina supplement of the 1950s, the sermon has not previously been translated into any language 2. Despite its considerable interest, not much attention has been devoted to it by patristic scholarship in recent years, apart from a few important articles published by J. Danielou and P. F. Beatrice in the 1970s 3.

1 Richard Reitzenstein, ‘Eine frühchristliche Schrift von den dreierlei Früchten des christlichen Lebens,’ ZNW 15 (1914) 60-90.

2 Patrologia Latina, Supplementum I (Paris, 1958) 53-67.

3 Jean Daniélou, 'Le traité De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima et le Judéo-Christianisme latin avant Tertullien,’ VC 25 (1971) 171-181; idem, A History of Early Christian Doctrine before the Council of Nicaea, Vol. 3, The Origins of Latin Christianity, tr. David Smith and John Austin Baker (Philadelphia, 1977) 63-92;

Philip Sellew, The Hundredfold Reward for Martyrs and Ascetics: Ps.-Cyprian, De centesima, sexagcsima, triccsima, St Pair 36 (2001) 94 98.
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Sandt, The Didache, 2002, p. 239 - TWOGIG

(Hunter, Marriage, Celibacy, and Heresy, 2009, p. 114-115) - TWOGIG

Bogdan Gabriel Bucar - 2007
https://svots.academia.edu/BogdanBucur
The Son of God and the Angelomorphic Holy Spirit: A Rereading of the Shepherd’s Christology*
https://www.duq.edu/academics/faculty/bogdan-bucur
https://www.marquette.edu/maqom/bogdan2.pdf
An off-hand remark in the sermon De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, states that God first created seven angelic princes out of fire (cf. Heb 1,7; 2 En 29,3), and later made one of the seven into his Son. 73
The Angelic Spirit in Early Christianity: Justin, the Martyr and Philosopher
https://www.marquette.edu/maqom/bogdan3.pdf
https://www.academia.edu/4996265/Th...ristianity_Justin_the_Martyr_and_Philosopher_

Remi Gounelle - 2011
http://brepols.metapress.com/content/l131743087330220/

Jeroen Beekhuizen - 2019 - TWOGIG|

(Wilhite and Jefford, The Didache, 2019, p. 18; cf. Reitzenstein, esp. p. 79, lines 132-135) TWOGIG

Jonathan A. Draper, The Didache, academic.edu, 2019, p. 2-3, 6-7 - TWOGIG
https://ukzn.academia.edu/JonathanDraper
https://www.academia.edu/10188927/The_Apostolic_Fathers_The_Didache
https://www.academia.edu/13346118/The_Didache_A_Missing_Piece_of_the_Puzzle_in_Early_Christianity
https://www.academia.edu/11195007/A...Dead_Sea_Scrolls_and_Related_Documents_Part_I
Chapter 6, p. 133
Knopf is right in thinking
that it must have concerned a burning issue of the day, but there is
nothing to suggest that this issue was asceticism. Certainly this was how
the text came to be U3ed at a later stage by later writers, as the evidence
set out by W. Rordorf shows. [293 It was taken to refer to two classes of
Christians: ascetics who live the "perfect life" and others who keep the
minimum moral teaching represented by the Two Ways. Striking support for
this interpretation is given by the early sermon, De Centeslma, published
by R. Reitzenstein, [30] which interprets Mt 13:8 as referring to different
classes of Christian, yielding different fruits. The sermon cite3 Did. as
"Scripture'1 in support of this contention: "et alio in loco scriptura haec
testatur et admonet dicens: "Si potes quidem, fili, omnia praecepta domini
facere, eris consummatus; sin autem, uel duo praecepta, amare dominum ex
totis praecordiis et similem tibi quasi <te ipsum>". It is worth noting,
however, that even here, the reference to the "yoke of the Lord" has been
removed. [31] The evidence of this Second or Third Century sermon is
confirmed by the testimony of Eusebius in Demonstratio, 1.8 (29b), who
claims that Christ’s disciples gave two different kinds of teaching, one
for those who "rose above human nature" and the other for the weak
majority, so that the law of Christ offers Bumv . This higher way is
called by Eusebius "the more perfect form ( of the Christian
life", Rordorf is surely right in his contention that Egyptian monasticism
absorbed the Two Way3, which passed into the Life of Shenudi and into the
Rule of Benedict. [32] It may well be because of this ascetic
interpretation that Did. 6:2-3 has survived in the tradition at all.

However, although it must be conceded that the tradition came to be
used in this way, it does not follow that it was the original sense of Did.
6:2 or of Mt 13:8. Thus Rordorf is wrong in concluding that Did. reflects
the same ascetic tradition as later interpreters of the Two Ways, [33] The
ascetic interpretation of Did. 6:2 has been challenged by A. Stuiber who
sees no trace of asceticism anywhere in Did. [3*0 Moreover, the expression
"the whole yoke of the Lord" is never used in this way outside Did. and, as
has been seen, even De Cent, deletes this phrase. The food law which

[30] "Eine fruhchristliche Schrift von den dreierlei Fruchten des
christliehen Lebens", ZNW 15, 1912*, PP 60-90.
C31] It should also be noted that this version of the Did. text has the
Wisdom form of address: fili. It is more likely that it dropped out of
the Did. text, than that it 3hould be arbitrarily inserted in this
citation.


Looking for spots with Centesima, Hundredfold

Laetitia Ciccolilni - 2020
https://sorbonne-universite.academia.edu/LaetitiaCiccolini
sent inquiry - July, 2022
Scripture in the North African Treatises of Pseudo-Cyprian
https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/9781614516491-007/pdf


===========================

Facebook -
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PBF
https://purebibleforum.com/index.php?threads/hundredfold-martyrs-ps-cyprian.948/
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CARM

Grantley - missing
TWOGIG - excellent

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Walter Thiele
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filius is documented in addition to Cyprian in Hss 67 0ÜD, in the citations of Pseudo-Augustinus (Solutiones diversarum quaestionum ab haereticis obiectarum, Biblica 23 [1942] 263), Eugenius von Karthago (CV 7, 60 in the tradition branch ß>) and Cassiodorus (PL 70, 1373 A), also in an allusion in Pseudo-Cyprian (De centesima, sexagesima, tricesima 44, ZNW 15 [1914] 87), to name only the most reliable witnesses.
 
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Steven Avery

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cjab on Danielou on CARM
https://forums.carm.org/threads/hundredfold-martyrs.10873/#post-828291

1023. J. Danielou, “Le traite De centesima , sexagesima, tricesima et le judeo-christianisme latin avant Tertullien,” VigChrist 25 (3, 71) 171-181.

Extracts....(french text englished)

The pseudo-Cyprianist sermon on the three rewards has given rise to various interpretations. Its first publisher, Reitzenstein, placed it at the end of the Second Century. Hugo Koch, emphasizing connections with Cyprian, placed it at the end of the Third Century. M. Heer recognized both pre-Cyprianist data and others who depend on Cyprian. He seems to have charted the right course. The redaction that we have of this treatise is later than Cyprian. But it is a reworking of a Judeo-Christian sermon of the Second Century. V Esdras among the testimonies of Latin Judeo-Christianity before Tertullian. This is what I would like to show. The De centesima presents in the biblical material features characteristic of an archaic Judeo-Christian tradition. This is worth several aspects. The first is the freedom in the use of biblical quotations, which tends to be attenuated from the beginning of the third century. I note here some examples. Thus for the quotation of Is. consummatum faciet Dominus super terram, which abbreviates the biblical text, whereas Cyprian (Test. 11,3) reproduces it in its entirety.

The interest of our text is that it appears to be the first "to establish a relationship between the three rewards and the martyrs, the virgins and the spouses who maintain continence. Cyprian alludes to this, at least for the first two categories (Hab . virg. 31), as in something known. It seems likely that it depends on our treatise. Origen relates the three rewards to martyrs, virgins and widows, which is very close to Cent. ( Hom. Jos. II, 1). Later interpretation will deal with martyrs, virgins and married people - or else virgins, widows and married people.9 A particularly interesting feature of Judeo-Christian theology is the anthropology of our text: the earth, has a soul inspired by God. Indeed the spirit (spiritus) comes from heaven. The spirit possesses future things, the flesh possesses the blood>> (58, 35-37). There is, in the background, the Judeo-Christian theme, which we find in Tatian, of two principles created by God in man, an animal soul, identified with blood, and a celestial spirit: these two principles are in conflict (55,19-26; 58,36-37). There is an opposition between the first creation, where the flesh is dominated by the Spirit, and the state of man after the fall, where he is dominated by the blood. In the first state man is under the empire of God, in the second under that of the demon (64,13-15). The body, captive of blood, is liberated in Christ who sheds his blood. And this sanctified blood of Christ triumphs over our blood (56,51-57; 59,4-13). The body, prisoner of the blood, is the sheep led by the devil into the desert (58,49-53). It seems that here the theme of the possessed being dragged away by the demon in the desert of Luke 8.29 merges with that of the lost sheep. In any case, it will be noted that this horror of blood, considered as soul, is Semitic. It is found in Judeo-Christianity in pseudo-Clementine writings. Moreover, the very realistic conception of the body inhabited by the Spirit or by the demon is found in the Pastor. Tertullian rejected this conception of the evil material soul and spirit as equated with the breath of God from Gen. 2.7. Blood is the principle of the passions (59.1-5). Another important theme is that of the Word as the 76th day. His Judeo-Christian character and his relationship with the Pastor of Hermas are decisive. The text is as follows: “When the Lord created (created) the first seven angels from the fire, he decided to constitute himself one of them as a Son, whom Isaiah would announce as Lord Sabaoth. We therefore learn that there remain six angels created with the Son... Consider indeed the origin of the past time, at the end of which day the Lord ceased to work, he who exposed the commandment of the creation of all in saying, Heaven and earth were finished on the fifth day, and God rested from his works on the sixth, and he blessed the seventh. It is this day that without knowing it imitates the ascetic (agonista) by resting from works of iniquity. >> Then the text quotes Apoc. 4.7: Et vidi quartet animalia habenti alas senas. He continues: Non ignorandum est igitur de hoc titulo quod Christiani animalibus insist, propter quod et alas senas possident quibus in medio filius Dei graditur (60.50-61.37). This text has been extensively studied by Barbel, Christos Angelos (1941) 192-224. Three themes can be distinguished. First there is the creation of angels from fire, which is found especially in II Henoch. More important is the representation of the six angels in the midst of which is the Son of God, who is the seventh angel. This conception has only one equivalent, which is the Shepherd of Hermas, with the theme of the six angels created first (nprotot Krtoc0Ovteg) and in the middle of which is the Son of God (IX, 12, 8). The word principum of our text seems to relate well to this conception of the protoctists. Clement of Alexandria speaks well of the npo-r6ktic -rot, but there are seven of them and the Son is never known with them. The third theme is the assimilation of the seven angels to the seven days and of the Son to the seventh day. The angels are explicitly called days and the Son the seventh day, "the one whom God blesses". The designation of the Son as a day is a Judeo-Christian theme, which is already found in the Kirygma of Peter. This corresponds to Judeo-Christian speculations on the beginning of Genesis. The theme is not explicit in the Pasteur d'Hermas, but seems well assumed. It is also interesting to note the designation of the Son by the word Sabaoth borrowed from Is. 6,8. Sabaoth is a name of an angel in the apocalyptic (Orac. Sib. 1,304,316). Reitzenstein and Barbel have recalled this6. Gnosticism took over the word. One text is of particular interest in the Hypostasis of the Archons. Sabaoth appears as the son of Ialdabaoth, the leader of the Seven Archangels. But whereas Ialdabaoth is a fallen angel, Sabaoth is converted. He is exalted on the celestial chariot (143,413-31). Likewise in Cent. Sabaoth, the Son of God, advances in the chariot carried by the four animals which have six wings (61,28-37). Bullard clearly saw that the theme in the Hypostasis of the Archons stems from the Jewish apocalyptic. It is the same in our case. We will also note the strange doctrine of the cessation of creation at the end of the fifth day. Maybe it can be clarified. Victorin de Pettau writes: Prius opera sua consummavit quam angelos creavit et hominemfabricavit (Fabr.; Routh, III, 457). This is the sixth day. .... And furthermore the creation of the angels is related to the sixth day. There is therefore a doctrine of the creation of angels on the sixth day, before the creation of man. Also Cent. writes that the ascetic "imitates the six angels, in that, while he is a corporeal man, he testifies that he is spiritual". This seems to indicate that the five days correspond to the creation of the material world and the sixth day to that of the spiritual world, the angels and the spiritual man. The sixth day thus appears essentially not as that of rest in the sense of reward, which is the seventh day, but of rest in the sense of the cessation of material works. It is he who abstains from the works of the flesh who pretends to obtain the reward of sixty. It is not impossible that there is here also an allusion to Friday as a day of jefine. In the same context Victorin calls it: Hoc die ob passionem Domini Jesu Christi aut stationem Deo aut ieiunium facimus (ibid.)
However, a precise study of the whole of the quotation that we find in our Sermon will show us that it rests on a file of encratite (a member of certain 2d century ascetic sects that condemned sexual intercourse, clericalism, and the use of animal food and strong drink) tendency. A first indication is given to us by a testimonium which we have mentioned: “Blessed are those who have wives as if they had none. >> The verse recalls I Cor. 7.29. But in its exact form, it is found in the Acts of Paul (5) and in Ephrem (Assemani, 1,16D. See Resch, Agrapha, p. 274). The rapprochement is decisive. Our author knew the Acts of Paul or their source. He belongs to the same encratite milieu. Now we know that the Acts of Paul were attacked by Tertullian. They are from the end of the Second Century. We are therefore brought back to the Latin milieu prior to "Tertullian". Acts of Paul Another quotation on which our author relies is: Filii aevi huius nubunt et nubuntur; filii autem illius aevi, qui digni habentur esse resurrectione a mortuis, neque nubunt neque nubuntur. The text is inspired by Luke 20:34. But it includes an important variant. Luke does not speak of "sons of the other century", but of those who are worthy of the other century". This is what we find in the De habitu virginum of Cyprian (22) Our author wanted to oppose "the sons of this world>> and the "sons of the other world". text towards the opposition of the two centuries". Quispel has shown that this text is capital for the encratites. They do not understand it from the f know that in the next life marriage will no longer exist, but that from this life it must be rejected6. encratite. Clement of Alexandria writes: These in the same way support their thesis by the quotation: The sons of the other century neither marry nor take a wife>> (Strom. III, 12,87,1). This is exactly our text. And Clement continues: <But this question concerns the dead and those who inquire about their future fate and does not show the Lord condemning marriage. Moreover the word "the sons of this century" is not said by him in opposition to the sons of some other century, since all those who are born in this world, being sons by birth, are born and begotten>> (III 12,87,3). We see that our quotation was at the heart of the discussions with the encratites and belonged to their file in the form that Cent proposes to us. A final remark should be made about this quote. In Luke 20,34, it is "to a question posed by the Jews to the disciples that Christ answers. Now we read in Cent.: Cum Thomas a Judaeis lege Moysi urgeretur (64,37). This mention of Thomas is singular It is not found in Luke. We know the place that Thomas holds in Encratite circles. It is from them that the Gospel of Thomas comes to us. We are in the presence of a logion analogous to those of this Gospel. and which must come from the same tradition. We have an analogous case in a quotation attributed to Paul and which had not hitherto been identified: Qui continens est in omnibus continens permaneat, non tantum corpore, sed spiritu (60, 7-9). It seems that we are in the presence of a modified quotation from I Cor. 9,25.....

......Now these two texts are quoted in Clement's controversy against the Encratites, perhaps here the Marcionites. With regard to the first, Clement quotes it thus: "It is sin which, fighting against the law of God and of my spirit, he says, makes me captive to the law of sin" (III, 11, 77.1). Clement emphasizes that it is sin acting through the body of which man is captive and criticizes the encratites for not citing what concerns sin. This is precisely the case with our text. As for the second, Clement quotes it in the form it has not in 7.16, but in 7.20: Si quod nolo hoc facio, iam non ego operor illud, sed quod habitat in me peccatum. Here again it is the reminder of sin which is essential......

The Encratites .... used the Epistle to the Romans in the sense of a dualism of mind and body and a condemnation of the body as the source of sin. Clement shows that the body is good and that it is only sin that makes it the instrument of evil. Now Cent. refers only to the opposition of mind and body. The whole last part, the one that targets married people, has as its main object to show that Paul, after his conversion, renounced flesh and blood, that is to say marriage, and that he is therefore a model for marius people to give it up. Moreover, these quotations are not the only ones that are common to our text and to the file that Clement uses in his controversy against the encratites. There we find precise allusions to "I Cor. 7,29 (Strom. III, 14,95,3); to Math. 10,37 (111,15,97,2). We will also find the formula of I Petr. 1.21: "Be holy as I am holy." It is interpreted by Cent of sanctimonia, that is, of continence in marriage (62, 43-44). repeats, as he does for the other formulas, in a non-encratite sense. But it is clear that he is discussing the texts which were used by the encratites and that he restores their true meaning to them. This is also the case for the quotation of I Petr. 1,24 (Strom. 111,16,103,2). But more significant is the interpretation of Gen. 3,15. Per Cent. "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil " is sexual union. The prohibition to eat the fruit of the tree is a call to continence. It is under the instigation of the devil that Adam and Eve violate the commandment (64,13- 31. Now this is found in Cassian, whose thesis Clement exposes and discusses (111,17,103,1-104,5). elsewhere to identify the tree at the wedding. But the text means that it is capable of good or bad use. The theme of the tree of good and evil to designate concupiscence is found in Od. Hello. 111.9. It seems that it is in this sense that Cent. the interpreter (66.2). This use by Cent. of an encratite file makes it possible to respond to those who affirm the dependence of our text on Cyprian' because of the fact that quite a number of biblical quotations, about fifteen, are found at once in Cent. and in Cyprian, in the De habitu virginum and the Testimonia ad Quirinum. But a careful examination shows that this argument is not convincing. Among these quotations, several appear in Cent. with modifications compared to the biblical text which have an archaic character whereas they have their correct form in Cyprian. This is the case of Mth. 7.21, which is found in Justin, I Apol. 16, 9-10 with the same modification; of I Cor. 7.29, which comes from the apocryphal Acts of Paul; from Luke 20.34, which is quoted in this form by Clement of Alexandria; of Ps. 118.1; Math. 22.40; John. 3.5; I Cor. 3.16; I Cor. 10, 23; I Cor. 6.15; Apoc. 14.4. It would be unlikely that these quotations were taken from Cyprien. The solution seems to be that the two authors refer to a collection of Testimonia. We have proof of this in the study by Michel Reveillaud.

This showed that Cyprien had used a collection of unpublished Testimonia. Now at least five of the common quotations "Cent. and "Cyprien are indicated by Reveillaud as borrowed by Cyprian" from this collection. These are Joh. 6,38; I Joh. 2,17; Is. 10,23; Math. 22, 40; Joh. 5.14. This collection was of an ascetic character. It was first used by Cent. in an incratic sense, as we have seen. Cyprian used it in his turn, correcting it from the point view of the text and eliminating tendentious lines. It is also to this collection that the agraphon belonged: Omnia ista in saeculo nata et in saeculo remansura, commun " Cent. and has Habit. These remarks allow us to draw some conclusions. The sermon De centesima, which Cyprian doubtless knew and whose rather primitive Latin was retouched in his entourage, is a Judeo-Christian Latin sermon from the end of the Second Century. It presents characteristic features of Judeo-Christianity: freedom in the use of biblical quotations, allegorical exegesis of parables, angelomorphic Christology, against which we know that Tertullian "reacted. Other traces of Judeo-Christianity in South Africa Nord before Tertullian have been noted by G. Quispel, The Discussion of Judaic Christianity, Vig.Chr.22 (1968) 93.

Moreover, he uses a file of Pauline texts which is for the most part that which we know from Clement of Alexandria to have been that of Tatian and Julius Cassian. It is possible that he used the Diatessaron of Tatian in his Latin translation. He presents specifically encratite features. He therefore testifies to a Judeo-Christian current, of encratite tendency, in Africa at the end of the Second Century. It is a monument of the first Christian Latin literature before Tertullian.

.
 
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Leslie Dossey

Peasant and Empire in Christian North Africa (2010)
Leslie Dossey

cjab puts up
text

THE SOCIAL SPACE OF NORTH AFRICAN ASCETICISM
by LESLIE DOSSEY

North African asceticism before the monastery
___________________________________________________
Our record of the North African ascetic tradition begins in the third century, with
Tertullian and Cyprian. These earliest North African Christian sources make frequent
reference to men and women practicing chastity, renouncing marriage, and sharing their
possessions in imitation of the apostles. They nevertheless fully expected Christians to live
in the world.
.
.
.
When the opportunities for actual martyrdom declined, a vow of continence (sancti-
monia) came to be seen as a substitute for actual martyrdom in North Africa as elsewhere.
It represented a similar separation from the non-Christian world, but not a desire to reject
the society of Christian brothers and sisters. Martyr accounts increasingly linked martyrdom
to chastity in the persons of the martyrs themselves, thus combining the two surest roads
to salvation. Preachers urged the newly baptized to imitate the martyrs by becoming
celibate. The Pseudo-Cyprianic Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima is one of the clearest
North African examples of this exhortation. This sermon, which has been dated to the
third or early-fourth century, urged all those who had been baptized to make a vow of
sanctimonia : “because those who accomplish such an injunction will possess the fruit of
martyrdom, even if they are deprived of martyrdom itself.

Virgins who did so would be entitled to a sixtyfold reward. Married Christians who kept chaste after baptism would gain a thirtyfold reward. Those who engaged in married sex after baptism got no reward
at all. Christians who succeeded in pursuing such celibacy, in their minds as well as their
bodies, would be entitled to be called athletes – agonistae – the same term that was used for
the martyrs themselves. There is no hint that these chaste Christians were expected to
renounce human society in general or live in any sort of seclusion ; sexual renunciation in
itself sufficiently constituted an agon and murus contra bellum diaboli. The inheritors of this
North African tradition of martyr-inspired celibacy were the Donatist agonistici or, as their
enemies called them, the circumcelliones, who “walked under a vow of the celibate” and
frequented the martyr shrines (cellae) that gave them their name.

As the fourth century progressed, however, we see signs that the North African church
hierarchy was moving away from advocating any generalized celibacy and instead urged
vows of celibacy mainly for those most closely associated with service to the altar – the
higher clergy (deacons and above) and consecrated widows and virgins. For the clergy,
such a vow of sanctimonia was, if not mandatory until the late-fourth century, nevertheless
extremely desirable.......The altar’s claim to being a holy space was closely connected to the cult of the martyrs : altars rested above martyr relics or on a spot that had a direct connection to the life or death of
a martyr. In a sense, therefore, celibates, by clustering around the altar, still maintained
their connection to the martyrs – and shared something of their holy promiscuity.

__________________________________________________

Now contrast with the encratic heresy of Tatian

Journal of Ecclesiastical History, Vol. XIX, No. 1, April 1968
The Heresy of Tatian—Once Again
by L. W. BARNARD
.

.
.
So Irenaeus {Adv. Haer. I. xxvi.i}, after referring to the beliefs of the
Encratites, goes on: 'And this has been but lately discovered by them,
a certain Tatian being the first that taught the horrible doctrine.
This man, who had been a hearer of Justin, as long
as he was in company with him, exhibited nothing like
this, but after [Justin's] martyrdom, having apostacised from the Church, and
elated with the conceit of a teacher, and vainly puffed up as if he surpassed
all others, he established a peculiar characteristic of his own doctrine, by
inventing certain invisible aeons, similar to those of Valentinus. Marriage
also he asserted, with Marcion and Saturninus, was only corruption and
fornication. And he also devised arguments of his own against the salva-
tion of Adam'.

Irenaeus's denunciation of Tatian revolves around three points:
(i) he invented certain invisible aeons like Valentinus; (2) marriage, he
held, was a 'corruption' and 'fornication' as Marcion and Saturninus
taught; (3) he denied the salvation of Adam. If these views are to be found
in the Oratio in embryo then Tatian must have taught them before Justin's
death, i.e. in the 'orthodox' period of his life. This seems to be the case:
thus:

(1) in Orat., xx he speaks of 'superior aeons', beyond the finite and
bounded heavens which have no change of seasons (the cause of diseases),
which enjoy a 'happy' temperature and have perpetual day and light
unapproachable by men below. It would seem that these 'aeons' are the Valentinian aeons,
which constitute the Pleroma, and the 'better earth' is Para-
dise, which Theodotus identifies with the fourth heaven. However, it is
noticeable that Tatian nowhere mentions the syzygies, the procession of
pairs from the pleroma; neither does he suggest that God was not creator
of the present world. Indeed, he asserts that matter was created by God,
not by the demiurge (Oral., v). His mention of the 'aeons' is consonant
with Valentinus's teaching in the Gospel of Truth, if that be his, rather than
with the later Valentinian teaching.


(2) Tatian was accused in later ages of holding an encratite view of
marriage and that all sexual relations were impure. 2 But even in the Oratio
there are indications of this view. So in Orat., viii, in referring to the
Homeric gods, he couples marriage with corruption of boys and adultery
as undesirable traits which hearers are prompted to follow. Aphrodite, he
complains, is delighted with conjugal embraces. While philosophical
criticism of the anthropomorphism of the deities was well known, and is
found in other writers, it is nevertheless significant that Tatian regards
marriage as on the same level as fornication and paederasty.
 

Steven Avery

Administrator
HITS:
● Certainly, whoever might be so inclined to accomplish the work of those six angels, he shall enjoy so much
blessedness [fruitfulness] as the illustrious three, the Father and Son and Holy Spirit, which therefore you
long for in the kingdom of heaven.[1] ...Therefore you who have learnt to receive God through virtuousness,
observe his promise too, which said : Anyone not reborn from water and holy spirit, will not enter into the
kingdom of heaven. Therefore you who will long to arrive in the kingdom of heaven, do not cast out that spirit of
renewal by your lustful living.[2] ...For He Himself [Christ] is a step in the ascent into heaven, for He Himself is the
gate, Himself the entry into life, by whom in your redemption from the contagion of the world you have been
spiritually bound by the Three Witnesses. This Trinity, therefore, increases by the Ten Words [i.e.,
multiplied by the 10 Commandments] so that the thirty-fold reward is completed. [i.e.,”the sum”that is 30 (3
multiplied by 10)].[3]
○ Latin:
1. utique qui se disposuerit ad [Line 239] persequendum opus illorum angelorum sex, percipiet
fructus tam praeclaros [Line 240] tres, patrem et filium et spiritum sanctum qui ergo in
regnum caelorum cupies. (Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by
Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 83, lines 238-240)
2. qui ergo deum per sanctimonium accipiendum didicisti, et promissum eius [Line 283] obserua, qui
dixit: Si quis non renatus fuerit ex aqua et spiritu sancto, [Line 284] non intrabit in regnum
caelorum. qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies [Line 285] peruenire, illum spiritum renouationis
tuae lasciue uiuendo noli expellere. (Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima,
edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 84, lines 282-285)
3. ipse est enim gradus ascensionis in caelum, ipse est enim porta, ipse in- [Line 287] -troitus vitae,
a quo in redemptione tua a mundi contagione tribus testimoniis [Line 288] spiritaliter sis
religatus. trinitas ergo ista per decem verba adolescit, ut [Line 289] trecesima merces
compleatur. (Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein,
dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 84, lines 286-289)
● For the Law of the Lord is hard and bitter, but it makes bitterness, in order that it might reveal sweetness. For also
by John this is demonstrated, when the spirit hands over the book to the angel who broke the seals, saying:”Take
the book and eat it up. And it shall make thy belly bitter, but in thy mouth it shall be sweet as honey.”This means:
by the mouth of three witnesses it will be proved, that is: by the mouth of the Father and Son and Holy
Spirit it will be confessed, because it is apparent that honey [Latin: mel] is written in three letters. For certainly,
we also read honey [Latin: mel], constituted of three letters.
○ Latin: lex enim domini dura est et amara, [Line 349] <sed> amaritudinem facit, ut dulcedinem ostendat.
nam et per Iohannem de- [Line 350] -monstravit, cum spiritus [PAGE 87] librum angelo sigilla solventi
traderet dicens:”Accipe [Line 351] librum et devora eum et amaritudinem faciet ventri tuo, sed in ore tuo
erit [Line 352] dulce, tamquam mel.”(Rev 10:9) hoc est per os trium testium probari, id est per os
[Line 353] patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri, quod mel tribus litteris constat scribi; [Line 354]
nam et mel quidem legimus tribus litteris statui. (Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima,
edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15, p. 86-87, lines 348-352)
Translator Jeroen Beekhuizen's note: The author explains the text of Revelations 10:9 to refer to the testimony
of the Trinity. The clue to this is the Latin word”mel”(honey) which he finds in the text. To the author this has a
deeper meaning than”honey”alone, because this word was deliberately chosen (according to the author) for it's
three letters (m-e-l). At least, this is how I understand these Latin lines. (Jeroen Beekhuizen, Correspondence, 28
October 2019)
 

Steven Avery

Administrator
Ps-Cyprian, Sermo de centesima, sexagesima, tricesima, edited by Reitzenstein, dans ZNTW, 1914, 15,

● Certainly, whoever might be so inclined to accomplish the work of those six angels, he shall enjoy so much blessedness [fruitfulness] as the illustrious three, the Father and Son and Holy Spirit,

=========

...Therefore you who have learnt to receive God through virtuousness, observe his promise too, which said : Anyone not reborn from water and holy spirit, will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Therefore you who will long to arrive in the kingdom of heaven, do not cast out that spirit of renewal by your lustful living.[2]

...For He Himself [Christ] is a step in the ascent into heaven, for He Himself is the gate, Himself the entry into life, by whom in your redemption from the contagion of the world you have been spiritually bound by the Three Witnesses. This Trinity, therefore, increases by the Ten Words [i.e., multiplied by the 10 Commandments] so that the thirty-fold reward is completed. [i.e.,”the sum”that is 30 (3 multiplied by 10)].[3]

○ Latin:

1. utique qui se disposuerit ad [Line 239] persequendum opus illorum angelorum sex, percipiet fructus tam praeclaros [Line 240] tres, patrem et filium et spiritum sanctum
(p. 84, lines 240-242)

https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA84
1659524463483.png


2. qui ergo deum per sanctimonium accipiendum didicisti, et promissum eius [Line 283] obserua, qui dixit: "Si quis non renatus fuerit ex aqua et spiritu sancto, [Line 284] non intrabit in regnum caelorum". qui ergo in regnum caelorum cupies [Line 285] peruenire, illum spiritum renouationis tuae lasciue uiuendo noli expellere.
( p. 84, lines 282-285)

3. ipse est enim gradus ascensionis in caelum, ipse est enim porta, ipse in- [Line 287] -troitus vitae, a quo in redemptione tua a mundi contagione tribus testimoniis [Line 288] spiritaliter sis religatus. trinitas ergo ista per decem verba adolescit, ut [Line 289] trecesima merces compleatur.
( p. 84, lines 286-289)

1659524951785.png


● For the Law of the Lord is hard and bitter, but it makes bitterness, in order that it might reveal sweetness. For also by John this is demonstrated, when the spirit hands over the book to the angel who broke the seals, saying:”Take the book and eat it up. And it shall make thy belly bitter, but in thy mouth it shall be sweet as honey.”This means: by the mouth of three witnesses it will be proved, that is: by the mouth of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit it will be confessed, because it is apparent that honey [Latin: mel] is written in three letters. For certainly, we also read honey [Latin: mel], constituted of three letters.

○ Latin: lex enim domini dura est et amara, [Line 349] <sed> amaritudinem facit, ut dulcedinem ostendat. nam et per Iohannem de- [Line 350] -monstravit, cum spiritus [PAGE 87] librum angelo sigilla solventi traderet dicens: ”Accipe [Line 351] librum et devora eum et amaritudinem faciet ventri tuo, sed in ore tuo erit [Line 352] dulce, tamquam mel.”(Rev 10:9) hoc est per os trium testium probari, id est per os [Line 353] patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri, quod mel tribus litteris constat scribi; [Line 354 nam et mel quidem legimus tribus litteris statui.
( p. 86-87, lines 348-352 )

https://books.google.com/books?id=NNsMAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA86
1659525738681.png
 
Last edited:

Steven Avery

Administrator
Wohlenberg

1659543143364.png


Hoc eet per os trium testium probari, id est per os patris et filii et spiritus sancti confiteri, qnod mel tribus litteris constat scribi; nam et fei quidem legimus tribus litteris statui “ (s. o.). Jeder wird sich an 1 Job. 5, 7 erinnert fohlen, an die berühmte Stelle von den drei Zeugen. Die Textgeschichte weist, was den Ursprung dieser dem 1 Job. ursprünglich fremden Stelle betrisst, nach Afrika und Spanien. Sie findet nich bekanntlich, mehr oder weniger vollatändig, xuerst im sog. Speculum (m) ferner im pseuiohieron. Prolog su den „kanonischen“ = katholischen Briefen; bei PriscilL tract I, p. 6, Vigil, v. Tapa, Fulg. v. Rospe, Cassiodor. Bei Cyprian de uuit eccL 6 heisst es: de patie et filio et spiritu sancto scriptum est: Et tres unum sunt.
 

Puxanto

New member
hi, listen what edition you have '' ipse est enim ''''porta'''', ipse introitus vitae'' ; ''it is correct: ipse est enim '''''portus''''', ipse introitus vitae''; it is irrilevant but not irrilevant the proposition 40 linee distant pls attention. I have wrong trusting the transcription you brought from the 1914 edition; I thought the manuscript and the transcript ed 1914 differed at that point. PLS attention. You sure ed 1914 have porta and not ''portus''? I await an answer with screenshot
 

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Steven Avery

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Find spot

66 - Philip Sellew, Critica Et Philologica, 2001, p. 94

67 - The use of parentheses is described as "these witnesses attest the readings in question, but that they also exhibit certain negligible variations which do not need to be described in detail". Kurt Aland, The Text of the New Testament, 1995, p. 243.


Sellew - Page 94-98- 94 and 97 are online.
 
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