Michael Swift on 8 'holies' in Revelation 4:8 - Trisagion

Steven Avery

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Textus Receptus Academy - Revelation 11:17-18 - Luke Carpenter - Alexandrinus
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Greek Manuscripts in Revelation
https://www.purebibleforum.com/index.php?threads/the-greek-manuscripts-of-revelation.3511/

Revelation manuscripts on Mount Athos - Andreas Commentary
https://www.purebibleforum.com/inde...ripts-on-mount-athos-andreas-commentary.3007/

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One of the clearest evidences to me that Codex Sinaiticus is a work produced at Mt Athos by Simonides and his Greek Orthodox kin is the very blatant nod to the Orthodox Octoechos in Revelation 4:8 where we find the Ἅγιος repeated an incredible and completely non-authentic 8 times. The Orthodox Octoechos was not admitted until the Quinisext Council of 692. It was not developed as a concept until Pseudo-John of Damascus in the late 7th century. Whoever our scribe is, he is a very interested party in propagandising Orthodox Byzantine tradition. This is no fourth century scribe as the eightfold tonal system would not exist for another 3 centuries. There is no way on earth that a fourth century scribe gives a nod to the 7th century Octoechos. Sorry, folks. That doesn't happen. This work is a production of Simonides. This was no mistaken scribal reduplication. This is an intentional and first hand nod to the Orthodox Octoechos. Any Eastern Orthodox church member would understand that immediately. Only a scribe steeped in Byzantine tradition does this, and no one else. It is an unmistakable earmark of Simonides. 4:8 "και αναπαυϲιν ουχ εξοϲαν ημεραϲ και νυκτοϲ λεγοντεϲ αγιοϲ · αγιοϲ · αγιοϲ · αγιοϲ · αγιοϲ · αγιοϲ ˙ αγιοϲ αγιοϲ κϲ ┬ θϲ παντοκρατωρ · ο ην και ο ων και ο ερχομενοϲ" http://www.codexsinaiticus.org/en/manuscript.aspx?dir=next&folioNo=2&lid=en&quireNo=90&side=v&zoomSlider=0#

The specific number of 8 Ἅγιος, having 3 syllables each, indicates that the scribe is well aware of what he is doing and that they signify the 24 stichera, 3 contained in each of the 8 echos. This cannot have come from the 4th century. I cannot overstate that. This is pure 7th century Byzantine music theory at earliest.

Yes, and there's a very real reason. There eight tonal mode progressions comprised of 3 stichera in each of the eight echos. This would be very apparent to a Greek Orthodox monk trained in Byzantine music theory and to not many others. How likely is it that a scribe from the 4th century did this? It's not likely at all because it's impossible as the Octoechos system didn't even exist. In other words, it is impossible for this to be a manuscript any earlier than the 7th century. And I mean impossible. Yet, as it is in a 4th century script, it is impossible for it to be from the 7th century. Ergo, it is impossible for Sinaiticus to be anything but a modern anachronism or forgery. Impossible. Revelation 4:8 seals the deal. This is Simonides' work. He wasn't lying.

There is one verse that all scribes always get right - the Triadic Declaration. So, if it is not only not right, but duplicated, that's a giant road sign that the scribe is trying to call our attention to something very significant.

There are three syllables in Ἅγιος. Multiplied 8 times, we arrive at 24 syllables signifying the 24 stichera of the Octoechos. That is its significance and its only significance. Simonides might as well have signed his name to this manuscript. Connect the dots. Sinaiticus is an anachronistic celebration of all things Greek Orthodox. It rings back to a time of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. It belies the blatant nationalism of its scribe .

If you listen to the various stichera of the echos, you find that even in English they begin with the traditional 'Hagia' during Orthros. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMq8yrv6WGo

Mirrored

Vigilant Citizen Forums
The curious anomaly of the Orthodox Octoechos
https://vigilantcitizenforums.com/threads/the-critical-text-criticized.3461/page-4#post-269751

1610148601627.png


Quinisext Council
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinisext_Council

Even with the eight tones, in those early years there is no indication of increasing the number of holies.
https://uocregina.ca/2019/02/28/resurrectional-tones-octoechos/
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Revelation 4:8 (AV)
And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him;
and they were full of eyes within:
and they rest not day and night,
saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty,
which was, and is, and is to come.

Pure Bible
https://www.facebook.com/groups/pur...74381371100&reply_comment_id=2754278167997388

It looks like everything early is 3, quite an array:

Ephraem
Tertullian
Primasius of Hadrumetum (540)
Fulgentius
Victorinus (c. 260)
Apringius of Béja (548)
Beatus of Liebana (786)

Syriac, Armenian, Aethiopic, Arabic

(Andreas may be too ubiquitious to have a single entry.)

Maybe diserte is explained in the collation list. Which is in the front of Volume 1

Catalog and description
https://archive.org/.../HoskierApokalyp.../page/n67/mode/2up

Vol 2 may have more info, but is not as easily available.

===================

Patristic Commentaries on Revelation
Francis X. Gumerlock
http://www.kerux.com/doc/2302a5.asp
===================

Thus Juan Hernandez, like many not capable of thinking outside the Tischendorf box easily, has to reverse logic on its head:

Codex Sinaiticus: An Early Christian Commentary on the Apocalypse? (2015)
https://www.academia.edu/.../Codex_Sinaiticus_An_Early...

Finally, we have the multiplication of ‘Holies’ in Revelation 4:8. Rather than reading, ‘Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God Almighty’, Sinaiticus ascribes holiness to God eight times – just one shy of a perfect nine– which would be capable of crediting three ‘holies’ to each member of the Godhead.While we stop short of attributing such a motive to our scribe, it is nonetheless interesting that the later Trisagion Hymn does precisely that. 27 Perhaps the hymn’s origin can be traced to this kind of incremental expansion.

Revelation 4:8 (AV)
And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him;
and they were full of eyes within:
and they rest not day and night,
saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty,
which was, and is, and is to come.

All the extant evidences before about 900 AD are for 3 holies.

============================
ALL EXTANT TRUE EARLY EVIDENCES ARE 3 Holies - ADD CHRYSOSTOM below

Tertullian (c. 200)
Victorinus of Petovium (Pettau) (c. 270)
Athanasius (c. 340)
Ephraem (c. 350)
Rufinus (c.400)
Chromatius of Aquileia - (c 400)
Codex Alexandrinus (A) (c. 450)
Fulgentius (c. 510)
Primasius of Hadrumetum (540)
Apringius of Béja (548)
Andreas of Caesarea (c. 620)
Bede the Venerable (c. 720)
Beatus of Liebana (786)
Codex Polyphyrianus (P) (800s)
Smaragdus of Saint-Miheil (c. 820)

Tertullian on Prayer 3.2-3
https://books.google.com/books?id=L-pTAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA682
Otherwise, when is the name of God not "holy," and "hallowed" through Himself, seeing that of Himself He sanctifies all others-He to whom that surrounding circle of angels cease not to say, "Holy, holy, holy? "

Victorinus of Petovium (c.260)
http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/0712.htm
7-10. The first living creature was like to a lion, and the second was like to a calf, and the third had a face like to a man, and the fourth was like to a flying eagle; and they had six wings, and round about and within they were full of eyes; and they had no rest, saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord Omnipotent. And the four and twenty elders, falling down before the throne, adored God.

Athanasius on Luke 10:22
For the fact of those venerable living creatures offering their praises three times, saying “Holy, holy, holy,” proves that the three Subsistences are perfect, just as in saying “Lord” they declare the one essence.
https://books.google.com/books?id=6y41DQAAQBAJ&pg=PA67
Also by Kevin N. Giles (2009)
https://books.google.com/books?id=dAruAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA143

Rufinus (c.400)
So we read in John's Apocalypse about the seraphim: “And they rested not day and night, saying, 'Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of armies, who was, and who is, and is to come, the Almighty.'”
https://books.google.com/books?id=6y41DQAAQBAJ&pg=PA67

Chromitius of Aquileia (c.400)
"For, he saw the throne of God in heaven; he saw the Son of God sitting at the right hand of the Father; he saw the choirs of angels; he saw the twenty-four elders and the "four living creatures full of eyes on their front and back", shouting and saying with an unceasing voice in praise of the Lord: "Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts", heaven and earth are full of your glory. Hosanna in the highest."
https://books.google.com/books?id=gKA8CwAAQBAJ&pg=PA59
https://francisgumerlock.com/.../Ch-2-Chromatius-of...

Apringius (548)
"In this very teaching the worship of the Trinity is proclaimed and without rest the name Holy is declared by a threefold repetition. And this worship that is proffered to the one, omnipotent God reveals the Trinity of a single substance"
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA42

Bede
"Throughout the whole time of the world the holy living creatures proclaim the one dominion, the deity, the omnipotence and the eternality of the Holy Trinity, while the worship of the intelligent creation remains unending in heaven."
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA126

Andreas of Caesarea
"these holy powers do not rest, never ceasing the divine hymnody and offering the threefold blessing to the Tri-hypostatic Divinity. And the who is and who was and who is to come we said means the Holy Trinity"
https://books.google.com/books?id=AmMEhsEYHUsC&pg=PA84

Smaragdus
The holy living creatures affirm throughout every age the one dominion of the deity and the omnipotence and eternity of the holy Trinity with the perpetual praise of the rational creation abiding in heaven.

===========================

Versions

Latin Vulgate
Syriac,
Coptic
Armenian,
Aethiopic,
Arabic

================

Patristic Commentaries on Revelation
Francis X. Gumerlock
http://www.kerux.com/doc/2302a5.asp

ACCS
https://books.google.com/books?id=6y41DQAAQBAJ&pg=PA57
https://books.google.com/books?id=6y41DQAAQBAJ&pg=PA67

Check Zosimas

DRP
https://www.facebook.com/.../permalink/575903136588886/...

===============

The later Byzantine era started with larger numbers

ms. 046 - 9 times - 900s
Vatican Library, Vat. gr. 2066, fol. 249-268

============

Oecumenius - 7 times - 990 AD (maybe now AD 600)
https://books.google.com/books?id=JORIkBaj9HcC&pg=PA23

That they say “holy” seven times indicates that they do this often and without ceasing, for the holy scriptures customarily use the number seven to mean “many.” The following may serve as examples: “The barren has borne seven children, but but she who has many children is grown weak;" "seven eyes of the Lord that range through the whole earth"; "the righteous person is saved seven times from necessity".

William Weinrich - translates - Kirk finding Greek
Also, translated by John N. Suggit:
https://books.google.com/books?id=GGpSK6yLzvUC&pg=PA58

============

After that, many Byz have 9, with occasional other counts.

=================

Caesarius of Arles (no discussion of 3x) c. 530
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA70

Dionysius the Areopagite - 3x
http://www.historicism.com/Elliott/Appendix1-3.htm#_ftn84
Andreas ... For first, besides other authors, he quotes Dionysius, the so-called Areopagite
Viz. on Apoc. iv. 8, “And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him; and they were full of eyes within: and they rest not day and night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come.”.

=====================

Church Fathers Scripture Index
https://www.catholiccrossreference.online/fathers/index.php/revelation 4:8

Added Chrysostom below, and has one more without holies Ambrose.

CARM
https://forums.carm.org/threads/cod...entity-fraud-theft.15475/page-13#post-1330707

Tertullian
Ethical - On Prayer - The Second Clause - Chapter III
Otherwise, when is the name of God not “holy,” and “hallowed” through Himself, seeing that of Himself He sanctifies all others—He to whom that surrounding circle of angels cease not to say, “Holy, holy, holy?

Chrysostom
Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew . Matthew VI. 1.
Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” Yea, and the seraphim too, giving glory, said on this wise, “Holy, holy, holy.”

Athanasius: Select Writings and Letters
On Luke x. 22. (Illud Omnia, &c.) Il
For the Triad, praised, reverenced, and adored, is one and indivisible and without degrees (ἀσχηματιστός). It is united without confusion, just as the Monad also is distinguished without separation. For the fact of those venerable living creatures offering their praises three times, saying ‘Holy, Holy, Holy,’ proves that the Three Subsistences perfect, just as in saying ‘Lord,’ they declare the One Essence.
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Also check:

BCHF
http://earlywritings.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2071&start=30

===========================

Response to a Bad Translation of the Book of Revelation: (2014)
What’s Wrong with a Good Translation?
Juan Hernandez (Juan Hernández Jr,)
https://www.academia.edu/39410754/R...velation_Whats_Wrong_with_a_Good_Translation_


For them, “[g]rammatical errors, awkward sentence structures and perplexing vocabulary” (p. 6) are just as inappropriate and unacceptable as they are for the modern religious readership. The scores of changes to the text of the Apocalypse in the fourth-century are primary evidence of this very fact. Numerous are the words and phrases that are transposed, substituted, harmonized, and/or grammatically altered in Codex Sinaiticus. The process is repeated once again—and this time with even greater gusto—in the seventh-century, with the arrival of a separate group of correctors. Hundreds of the Apocalypse's idiosyncratic and infelicitous readings from the fourth-century were scrubbed from its text—upwards of 300 in all—and all in the service of a later Christian readership. In other words, sparing the Apocalypse’s readers from its “defective form” appears to have been the name of the game from the very beginning.

And we also have the multiplication of “Holies” in Revelation 4:8, where—rather than simply saying, “Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God Almighty”—Codex Sinaiticus ascribes eight holies to God just one shy of a perfect nine.
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Some scholars have been contacted .. e.g. on

Academia.edu:
Juan Hernandez
Armin Karim - The Meaning of the Trisagion in East and West
Alexandra Nikiforova
also Steven Friesen

Maria Barbaki - PhD | University of the Aegean, Mytilene

Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou

Wilbur Pickering should be corrected

Garrett E. Best - writes on grammar, some Facebook contact
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Simonides likely picked it up from:

Theoretikon mega tes mousikes (1832)
Chrysanthos of Madyto
https://archive.org/details/theoretikonmegat00chry/page/n6/mode/2up

Chrysanthos of Madytos - ( c. 1770-1846)
http://orthodoxwiki.org/Chrysanthos_of_Madytos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysanthos_of_Madytos

Octoechos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octoechos
Oktōēchos
(here transcribed "Octoechos"; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος Greek pronunciation: [okˈtóixos];[1] from ὀκτώ "eight" and ἦχος "sound, mode" called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from о́смь "eight" and гласъ, Glagolitic: ⰳⰾⰰⱄⱏ, "voice, sound") is the eight-mode system used for the composition of religious chant in Byzantine, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, Latin and Slavic churches since the Middle Ages. In a modified form the octoechos is still regarded as the foundation of the tradition of monodic chant in the Byzantine Rite today.
... Byzantine Chant performance practice has been computationally compared to the theory by Chrysanthos

Hagiopolitan Octoechos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagiopolitan_Octoechos
The Octoechos as a liturgical concept which established an organization of the calendar into eight-week cycles, was the invention of monastic hymnographers at Mar Saba in Palestine and in Constantinople. It was formally accepted in the Quinisext Council of 692, which also aimed to replace the exegetic poetry of the kontakion and other homiletic poetry, as it was sung during the morning service (Orthros) of the cathedrals.
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
And for background, the early church writers on Revelation 4:8.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/467...k/575903136588886/?comment_id=576140189898514
It looks like everything early is 3, quite an array:

Ephraem
Tertullian
Primasius of Hadrumetum (540)
Fulgentius
Victorinus (c. 260)
Apringius of Béja (548)
Beatus of Liebana (786)

Syriac, Armenian, Aethiopic, Arabic

(Andreas may be too ubiquitious to have a single entry.)

Maybe diserte is explained in the collation list. Which is in the front of Volume 1

Catalog and description
https://archive.org/.../HoskierApokalyp.../page/n67/mode/2up

Vol 2 may have more info, but is not as easily available.

===================

Patristic Commentaries on Revelation
Francis X. Gumerlock
http://www.kerux.com/doc/2302a5.asp
===================

Thus Juan Hernandez, like many not capable of thinking outside the Tischendorf box easily, has to reverse logic on its head:


Codex Sinaiticus: An Early Christian Commentary on the Apocalypse? (2015)
https://www.academia.edu/13710418/Codex_Sinaiticus_An_Early_Christian_Commentary_on_the_Apocalypse

Finally, we have the multiplication of ‘Holies’ in Revelation 4:8. Rather than reading, ‘Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God Almighty’, Sinaiticus ascribes holiness to God eight times – just one shy of a perfect nine– which would be capable of crediting three ‘holies’ to each member of the Godhead. While we stop short of attributing such a motive to our scribe, it is nonetheless interesting that the later Trisagion Hymn does precisely that. 27 Perhaps the hymn’s origin can be traced to this kind of incremental expansion.

2.7 On Andrew of Caesarea’s application of the Trisagion Hymn to each member of the Trinity see: J. Schmid, Studien zur Geschichte des griechischen Apokalypse-Textes 3 vols (Munich, 195 5-5(5): 1, Der Apokalypsc-Kommentar des Andreas von Kaisarea, Munchener theologische Studien 1, Historische Abteilung 1, p. 15,11. 12-15.

Juan.jpg
================================
Guiding to a Blessed End: Andrew of Caesarea and His Apocalypse Commentary in the Ancient Church
Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou
https://books.google.com/books?id=mM7aUdl9WB4C&pg=PA184
https://dokumen.pub/guiding-to-a-bl...ary-in-the-ancient-church-978-0813221144.html
The Trisagion had been primarily regarded as Trinitarian in Chalcedonian circles. Even though the exact words of the Trisagion are not found in the Apocalypse, Church Fathers considered it ‘'located” there in Rev. 4:8 (as well as in Isaiah 6:3), because of the repetition of the word “holy” in the angelic hymn: "Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty.” As we have seen, in chapter 10, Andrew expends much effort justifying the Chalcedonian view that the Trisagion hymn is Trinitarian, proving that "holy, holy, hoiy' is properly said of all three members

More in that book, similar.

Athanasius
https://books.google.com/books?id=dAruAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA143

Caesarius of Arles
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA70

Dionysius quoted by Andreas
http://www.historicism.com/Elliott/Appendix1-3.htm#_ftn84

Andreas -Andrew of Caesarea
https://books.google.com/books?id=JORIkBaj9HcC&pg=PA129

Chromatius
https://books.google.com/books?id=gKA8CwAAQBAJ&pg=PA59

Victorinus of Petovium (c. 260)
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA7

Apringius of Béja (548)
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA42

Oecumenius
https://books.google.com/books?id=JORIkBaj9HcC&pg=PA23
https://books.google.com/books?id=GGpSK6yLzvUC&pg=PA58

Bede
https://books.google.com/books?id=GWPV4-A9Kr0C&pg=PA126

Smaragdus

Ephraem
Tertullian
Primasius of Hadrumetum (540)
Fulgentius
Beatus of Liebana (786)
 
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Steven Avery

Administrator
Textus Receptus Academy
https://www.facebook.com/groups/467...k/575903136588886/?comment_id=575942889918244


Revelation 4:8 (AV)
And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him;
and they were full of eyes within:
and they rest not day and night,
saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty,
which was, and is, and is to come.

Hoskier collation
https://archive.org/details/Hoskier-ConcerningTheTextOfTheApokalypse/page/n949/mode/2up

Laparola
http://www.laparola.net/greco/index.php?rif1=73&rif2=4:8
(Tertullian 3x)

Codex Sinaiticus: An Early Christian Commentary on the Apocalypse?
Juan Hernandez (2015)
https://www.academia.edu/13710418/Codex_Sinaiticus_An_Early_Christian_Commentary_on_the_Apocalypse
(Juan is well-meaning, but trapped in the circular box, so Sinaiticus becomes the source for this and that.)

Metzger (1968)
https://archive.org/details/TheTextOfTheNewTestament2ndEdit/page/n203/mode/2up
Metzger (2005)
https://archive.org/details/TheTextOfNewTestament4thEdit/page/n287/mode/2up

Sinaiticus CSP
http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/manus...lioNo=2&lid=en&quireNo=90&side=v&zoomSlider=0

First column, rows 5-6-7

=====

What Michael shares can be collated on one blog post, and then shared. I would suggest first with some Greek Orthodox scholars, since textual critics are skilled in being clueless! :)

Steven Avery
Metzger has a bit in 1968 (same in 2005), see my post above, but he forgets to mention that Vaticanus Revelation is late medieval.

To any clear thinker, this is the type of anomaly about which
"clearly demonstrates the non-antiquity of Aleph" looks accurate. It would push it forward hundreds of years, and give great support to a Simonides and Mt. Athos operation.

However modern pseudo-scholars who are textual criticism dupes are very skilled at "dancing".

And I have a section on palaeographic puzzles on PBF. This should be added there and/or given its own page.

This starts in the middle of verse 8 and has our 8 holies and marks.
http://codexsinaiticus.org/en/manus...lioNo=2&lid=en&quireNo=90&side=v&zoomSlider=0

1610165167160.png

ADD THE CORRECTION ELEMENT!

=====================

MORE ON THAT THREAD TO BE CONTINUED

Steven Avery
It is very likely that the earliest true many-holies is 046, 10th century, and Oecumenius around 990 AD.


Codex Vaticanus 2066
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Vaticanus_2066

Codex Vaticanus 2066, designed by 046 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 1070 (von Soden), formerly it was known also as Codex Basilianus, previously it was designated by Br or B2.[1] It is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament written on vellum. The manuscript paleographically has been assigned to the 10th century by the INTF, though some palaeographers proposed the 9th century. Scrivener proposed even the 8th century.[2]

Wikipedia
"The missing part of Hebrews and Revelation were supplemented by a 15th-century minuscule hand (folios 760–768), and are catalogued separately as minuscule 1957."

For fun, here is Pickering with the faux text.
Apparently Hodges/Farsted also had the 9 holies.

1610167141010.png



You can actually see Wilbur Pickering giving a translation with nine holies here:

1610187517811.png


Using lectio difficilior .. despite the fact that ALL the early evidence is for 3 holies (maybe he thought Sinaiticus was truly ancient, and that will bamboozle any analysis.)

=========================


Where do we have the Sinaiticus 8 referenced as 9? Is there a spot or two? Remember, 9 is a common Byz reading (2nd place).8 is basically just Sinaiticus and could easily have come from Simonides working with the Octoechos. And the special accent marks are now a big part of that study.

And have you looked at that fourth one, which is odd?

And I have seen the Sinaiticus text looked upon as a possible trigger for the Trisagion Hymn, for those who actually think Sinaiticus is ancient and think backwards. (Juan Hernandez) However, even that is hard to correlate. Generally Sinaiticus is not mentioned in these studies, Hernandez has to figure out a way to pretend that Sinaiticus is early, against the evidence.

Thus, Sinaiticus becomes a pre-Andreas commentary, which makes no sense at all.
 

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Steven Avery

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Steven Avery

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While Hodges and Farsted and Pickering both go for the late Byzantine reading of 9 holies, Robinson-Pierpont has it mentioned as a B variant.

Rv4:8 Καὶ τὰ {Bτὰ♦-}τέσσαρα ζῷα, ἓν καθ' ἓν ἔχον {B ἔχον♦ αὐτῶν ἔχον}{N ἔχον♦ αὐτῶν ἔχων} ἀνὰ πτέρυγας ἓξ κυκλόθεν, καὶ ἔσωθεν γέμουσιν ὀφθαλμῶν, καὶ ἀνάπαυσιν οὐκ ἔχουσιν ἡμέρας καὶ νυκτός, λέγοντες, Ἅγιος, {B Ἅγιος ἅγιος ἅγιος ♦ἅγιος 9 times} ἅγιος ,ἅγιος, κύριος ὁ θεὸς ὁ παντοκράτωρ, ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος.

Variant readings within the Byzantine text stream are shown within brackets thus: {B...}
 

Steven Avery

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Witness of God is Greater
Its original Greek text is found in the oldest Greek manuscripts of the Octoechos, Sinait. gr. 1593 (fol. 66r) as well as in the eleventh-century Sinait. gr. 778 (fol. 38r).
 
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Steven Avery

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Hoskier on Trisagion

Revelation 4:8 - Hoskier - references to extra HOLIES
(Keep in mind that Hoskier skipped over Andreas commentary manuscripts!)


p. 730 - APOC 240
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p. 131
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p. 148-149 - APOC 50
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p. 167 - APOC 55
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p. 278
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p. 353 - Apoc 110
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p. 438 - APOC 128
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Steven Avery

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The Sanctus or Trisagion is the culmination of the prayers of thanksgiving offered by the celebrant in the Preface, an actual continuation of his final words: “The heavens and the heavenly hosts together with the blessed Seraphim in triumphant chorus unite… saying:” and the people, or choir then join with “Holy, Holy, Holy,” words which are adapted from the praises of the two seraphim found in Isaiah 6: 3, and Revelations 4: 8. The Trisagion is found in the Hebrew liturgy as early as the 2nd century, in the Gallican rite by 529, and in the Roman rite by the 7th century.

And the expansion is later :)

A CONDUCTOR'S ANALYSIS OF ANTONIO MARIA VALENCIA'S REQUIEM
Juan Camilo Hernández Carreño
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...usg=AOvVaw0gWHbkhUCV8OQWePrmtt2A&opi=89978449

Jeffers p. 80-81
Jeffers. Ron. Translations and Annotations of Choral Repertoire. Volume 1: Sacred Latin Texts. Oregon: Earthsongs. 1988.


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Steven Avery

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see footnote 27 Schmid
29 is Tischendorf

27 On Andrew of Caesarea’s application of the Trisagion Hymn to each member of the Trinity see:
J. Schmid, Studien znr Geschichte des griechischen Apokalypse-Textes, 3 vols (Munich, 1955-56): 1, Der Apokalypse-Kommentar des Andreas von Kaisareay Munchener theologische Studien 1, Historische Abtcilung 1, p. 15,11. 12-15.

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Steven Avery

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Compare: what does MAR say about Revelation 3:14 and Arianism?

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29 Tischendorf, Sinaiticus (1863), 11, 127*.

p. 175
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May also be in summary sections at end.
 
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Steven Avery

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bgreek
http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/test-archives/html4/1999-11/33939.html
Steven Craig Miller

<x-flowed>To: Tony Costa,

<< I had a question re: the 'trisagion' found in Rev 4:8. It appears 3
times, "holy, holy, holy". This comes from Isaiah 6:3 which in both the LXX
and MT also have "holy" 3 times. However, there is another MS or MSS which
have "hAGIOS" appearing 9 times at Rev 4:8. This does not appear as a
textual variant, but seems to have been added for emphasis. Any thoughts on
why this is the case? >>

R. H. Charles (ICC commentary) cites a number of MSS and versions with 3
holies including A 02 (5th century) and 025 (9th century); he cites a
"Scholia of Origen" with only 1 holy; 2 MSS with 2 holies; 2 MSS with 6
holies; 1 MS with 8 holies, namely Codex Sinaiticus, but it was corrected
to 3 holies; finally a number of MSS with 9 holies, including 046 (10th
century).

I checked three commentaries: Charles, Beale, and Roloff; none of them
comment on the variant reading of nine holies. The most obvious explanation
is that nine is merely three sets of three, and thus nine merely adds
rhetorical emphasis.

-Steven Craig Miller
Alton, Illinois (USA)
scmiller@www.plantnet.com

"... it is widely agreed that the sociological condition that most
distinguishes modern Western societies from others (those considered
premodern or traditional, and those of Asia, Africa, and the Latin American
forests and highlands) is that modern ones are organized around the
expectation of continuous change and growth" (Charles Lemert, "Social
Things: An Introduction to the Sociological Life," 1997:67).
 

Steven Avery

Administrator
Guiding to a Blessed End: Andrew of Caesarea and His Apocalypse Commentary in the Ancient Church
Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou
https://books.google.com/books?id=mM7aUdl9WB4C&pg=PA184
https://dokumen.pub/guiding-to-a-bl...ary-in-the-ancient-church-978-0813221144.html

See above

More on Sinaiticus P47 etc see Greek manuscripts of Revelation
ANDREW OF CAESAREA AND THE APOCALYPSE
IN THE ANCIENT CHURCH OF THE EAST:
Studies and Translation

p. 27-28
Another significant clue that Oikoumenios was Monophysite can be found in his
pointed assertion that the hymn of the seraphim was sung to Christ, a reference to the
Trisagion Hymn which had become a focal point for dogmatic debates between
Monophysitcs and Chalcedonians.92
92
2.13.1. On the use of the Trisagion hymn during this controversy, see Meyendorff Impérial Unity, 200 and
224, Meyendorff, Byzantine Theology 36-38, and Pelikan, The Spirit ofEastem Christendom, 59-60. Castagno
does not notice this détail. She focuses on the similarity of terms used by Monophysites and neo-Chalcedonians,
and Oikoumenios' lack of animosity toward the Empire to conclude that he was not Monophysite. "
Commenti," 323-4.

p. 147
But Andrew does
not use the commentary as an opportunity to attack pagans or heretics. The only hint of any
use of the commentary other than as a purely pastoral message directed at the flock might be
found in one instance in which Andrew is promoting doctrinal orthodoxy, probably in
response to Oikoumenios, a Monophysite.588

588
In response to Oikoumenios' comment that the Trisagion hymn, ("Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal,
hâve mercy on us") refers to Christ, Andrew explained how it refers to ail three members of the Trinity. See
below, chapter 5.6.6, page 183.

p. 150
Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, hâve mercy on us.

FIRST EXPANSION
To affirm the real union of the divinity and humanity in Christ, the Monophysites
stressed that the Logos suffered in the flesh ("theopaschism") and Severus of Antioch
inserted a phrase into the Trisagion Hymn which altered it to apply to Christ alone: "Holy
God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal, who was crucified for us, hâve mercy on us."

p. 184
While commenting on Rev. 3:7, ("And to the
angel of the church in Philadelphia write: "Thèse things says the Holy One, the True One"),
Oikoumenios cannot pass up the description of Christ as the "Holy One" without supporting
the Monophysite position on the Trisagion Hymn: "The holy one is the Son of God, so also
he receives witness from the Seraphim, who combine the three acclamations of holy in the
onelordship..."765

p. 194
Having proven that the "One who is, was and is to corne" is the
Father in Rev. 1:4, and that the Trisagion hymn refers to the Trinity, he states (We say) thèse
things to show that our own understanding does not contradict the patristic voices. L

p. 195
- 1 9 5 -
Chapter 6
Andrew's Theology
6.1 Doctrine
By ail indications Andrew was Chalcedonian orthodox in doctrine, and not a
Monophysite. Both Andrew and Oikoumenios sprinkle their commentaries with occasional
n i A
hints of their particular theological positions. In two places Oikoumenios makes rather
lengthy Christological statements which clearly indicate that he is Monophysite,8" but they
hâve the character of extraneous creedal proclamations rather than theological comments
prompted by his exegesis. Andrew does not engage in a doctrinal duel to directly réfute
Oikoumenios theologically, with the exception of his comments on the Trisagion hymn,
which had become a symbol of the disagreement between Chalcedonians and Monophysites.
The words of the ancient and well-known hymn are: "Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy
Immortal, hâve mercy on us." Monophysites inserted the phrase "who was crucified for us"
to emphasize that the Logos, which they insisted was "one nature after the union," had
suffered in the flesh
The hymn had been primarily regarded as Trinitarian in Chalcedonian circles. Even
though the exact words of the Trisagion are not found in Rev. 4:8, the Fathers considered it
located there, as well as in Isaiah 6:3, in the hymn of the angels “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord
Almighty.” Andrew expends much effort justifying the Chalcedonian view that the Trisagion
hymn is properly said of all three members of the T rinity by finding scriptural links between
each person of the Trinity and the Trisagion hymn through word association.812 What is
noteworthy is that he does not wait until Revelation chapter 4 to make these observations, but
includes this discussion as part of his exegesis of the phrase “the one who is, was and is to
come.” (Rev. 1:4) He concludes his excursus with the comment: (We say) these things to
show that our own understanding does not contradict the patristic voices.*13 When he arrives

p. 19
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p. 20
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p. 64
====================

582 He does refer to the Persians as "barbarians," however this was not a péjorative term in the Greek language,
but was the generic term to refer to anyone who did not know Greek. It came to be identified with people who
were not cultured because the Greeks closely identified the Greek language with culture. The Greek use of the
term "barbarians" is comparable to the catch-ail term "gentiles" or "the nations" which biblical authors used to
refer to ail those who were not Jewish.
 
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